A Knowledge Transfer Partnership between City, University of London, and construction engineering specialist Keltbray, is developing innovative Sustainable Reusable Pile (or Hollow Pile) technology which promises to substantially reduce carbon emissions from piling foundations. City has just signed an exclusive licence agreement with Keltbray for the development of this new technology for more sustainable deep foundation design and construction.

Hollow piles reduce the embodied carbon within bored piling foundations by reducing the volume of concrete required in each pile. Hollow piles potentially can be used for geothermal heating too, as the hollow core can be put to use. Both will have significant carbon reduction benefits.

Collaboration via KTP is a tried and tested approach which, for over 45 years, has linked innovation-focused businesses with specialist academic teams to realise key strategic goals. Each partnership is supported by a Knowledge Transfer Adviser from KTN – in this project it is Dr Matthew Hogan, who commented: “The licensing agreement between City and Keltbray is a big step towards the commercialisation of the innovative Hollow Pile technology.  The KTP approach facilitates both the transfer of knowledge to Keltbray and supports the final field testing of the technology. Keltbray is primed to be in a position to commercialise this innovation leading to significant carbon reduction both in construction and in the operation of the buildings they will support, making a positive contribution to the UK’s net zero agenda”.

See the full article about this KTP, which received funding from Innovate UK, on the KTP website here.

If you think a collaboration with a specialist Academic team could help your business deliver innovation impact, find out more about KTP here. Funding competitions for KTP are open throughout the year, with the current round closing on 14th April 2021.

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