The relationship between geospatial data and Net Zero might not be immediately obvious for everyone, but it is becoming increasingly apparent that the power of place is key to fighting the looming climate disaster – allowing us to monitor, adapt and become resilient to climate change.

The development of satellite technology, miniaturisation of key satellite components, and improvement of AI and machine learning, has progressed at an astonishing rate, meaning that more geospatial data than ever is being collected and processed. The availability of geospatial data at scale is unlocking new ways to develop meaningful insights into complex global climate science that can be applied to virtually any sector of the economy. These insights are already enabling decarbonisation across the global economy.

Identifying the optimal location for a wind farm can improve the generation of renewable energy, data-driven prediction of traffic can help to cut air pollution in inner cities, and modelling of flood risks to certain areas can allow for accurate planning decisions to be made for resilient housing. Positive strides like these, and many more besides, can be made with accurate and up-to-date geospatial data, but the potential of geospatial data for sustainability has not yet been fully realised.

Collaboration is key

KTN is working alongside 30+ partners in constructive, collaborative partnerships to bring you the Space and Geospatial Virtual Pavilion for COP26 (the 26th UN conference of the Parties for Climate Change), which seeks to showcase how we can realise the full potential of location intelligence in achieving carbon emission targets.

Taking place between 1-11 of November 2021, the Virtual Pavilion aims to support organisations and businesses operating in the Space and Geospatial ecosystem to engage with a cross-sector audience, to explore the value of collaboration as the key to build innovation with impact.

It has always been known that tackling climate change would require a united front, yet for too long lack of trust has meant that intellectual property and skills have been siloed, hindering the opportunity for invaluable data sharing for the benefit of all. No one organisation can stop global warming alone, and mutual exchange of information is a potent tool to slow its advance.

The pavilion brings together over 30 organisations including UK Space Agency, Space4Climate, ESA and the Satellite Applications Catapult to work towards a more united future in the struggle against climate change.

The pavilion will cover four main themes in its sessions:

  • Resilience – the future is increasingly uncertain thanks to human impacts on the climate, location intelligence is key to building resilient infrastructure and planning for future threats
  • Adaptation – better information on how climate change might impact us is crucial to protecting people and places
  • Finance – geospatial data is crucial to understanding the impacts of climate change on risk and our economy, as well as enabling effective investment in the areas that offer the best sustainability returns in the transition to a cleaner, greener future
  • Collaboration – at COP26 every voice must be heard if we are to work constructively in tackling the problems we face. Geospatial data provides a common thread between datasets, enabling effective collaboration for collective betterment.

Get Involved

Registration for the pavilion will be launched at the UK Space Conference on the 27-29th of September.

Be the first one to hear about the registration opening and get all the latest news about the Virtual Pavilion by following our Twitter channel here, and subscribing to our newsletter here.

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