A KTN and UCL event will look at the innovation landscape for vaccine development and manufacturing in the UK.

Vaccines are very much taken for granted in modern life. They protect us from a multitude of potentially fatal diseases and help limit the spread of antibiotic resistance by preventing diseases from spreading amongst populations.

Vaccination against childhood illnesses including diphtheria, measles, mumps, and rubella have become routine. According to World Health Organisation (WHO) data 116 million children are given basic vaccines world-wide each year.

Some commonplace diseases, such as influenza or the common cold, are caused by viruses that mutate quickly meaning that new vaccines must be constantly under development. For other diseases, such as malaria, no effective vaccine has yet been developed.

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Innovation in both vaccine development and manufacturing will play a key role in ensuring that the UK leads the way in the development of new vaccine technologies.

KTN is therefore hosting an event, in partnership with UCL, on the 6th September in London to bring together the vaccine development and manufacturing community in human health in the UK.

Delegates will learn about the latest innovative technologies, hear about current UK capabilities and Department of Health investments to date, the work of the UK Vaccine network and also potential future opportunities for funding through mechanisms such as the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund.

This one day event aligns with the KTN’s activities in medicines bioprocessing and manufacturing, as well as the Medicines Manufacturing Industry Partnership (MMIP).

Confirmed speakers include Tarit Mukhopadhyay (UCL), Dave Hunt, (AstraZeneca Speke), Franziska Kellner (Leaf Expression Systems) and Mike Sullivan (Innovate UK).

There will also be opportunity to set up 1-2-1 meetings throughout the day to maximise opportunities for networking and future collaborations.

Researchers can apply to present posters with the possible opportunity of a 2-3 minute poster flash presentation to the group.

You can find out more about this event here.

If you would like to discuss specific innovation opportunities for vaccines development and manufacture please contact Dr Sarah Goulding (Specialist, Medicines and Advanced Therapies).

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